Start Your Own Clan

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Many MMORTS games have minimum requirements (level, resources, or time played) they ask players to reach before starting their own clan. These restrictions aren’t arbitrary. Being the head of a clan brings many challenges and responsibilities: Other players will be putting their fate in your hands. You will probably need to commit more time to the game than before, and the dynamics of clan warfare are often quite different from regular gameplay.

If you aren’t sure whether starting a clan is right for you, consider spending time in an existing clan first. This will give you some exposure to what clan gameplay is like, and you can observe how the clan’s leader operates and the kind of duties he or she must handle. 

Have goals, have a vision

There are many clans out there, and each has a particular mindset and set of goals. Decide how you want your clan to operate and what you’ll encourage your clanmates to do. Are you primarily interested in socializing with clanmates, or will things be all business?

Do you want to pursue an aggressive raiding strategy or do you want to focus on defensive protection? To what extent will you require your clanmates to share resources and protect each other? Do you want a large clan with members from all over the world, or a small group of people you know well?

Some of these things might only become clear to you as your clan grows, but you should have at least some idea of how you will want your clan to operate. Give your clan a distinctive identity, and it will be more attractive to join.

Start small, think big

don’t expect your clan to become huge and powerful overnight. It takes time to accomplish your goals, and the world of massively-multiplayer strategy games is full of tough competition. Start with a small and tight-knit group—many games put a limit on the number of members a new clan can recruit anyway.

Start with friends you know outside the game or gamers you’ve associated with for a long time. Remember that as clan leader you will have to delegate many responsibilities to your subordinates, so make them people you trust.

It might be tempting to try and grow your clan as fast as possible, and accept any application you get. But recruiting a large number of players who turn out to be unproductive or, worse, have bad attitudes, is not progress.

Take the time to review applicants: check out their base, ask around if anyone else can vouch for them, and consider implementing a “trial period” for recruits to prove themselves before you accept them fully into your clan.